7 AdWords Extensions You Should Utilize to Improve PPC Conversion Rate!!

David Falor

Every AdWords advertiser wants more relevant clicks on their ads. The more relevant the click, the higher the chance that a visitor will convert into a lead and possibly a customer! If you’re looking to improve your PPC conversion rates by increasing your qualified clicks, one way to do this is to attach Ad Extensions on your AdWords campaigns.

What Are AdWords Extensions

When doing a Google search, you might see some ads take up more space than others. This is due to AdWords Extensions that give your ads the ability to display more information, therefore “extending” the length of your ad. When I search for “pizza near me”, two ads come up for Pizza Hut & Domino’s that both include extensions. Here’s what these ads look like with and without extensions:

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See how the ads with extensions provide more information and take up more space?

Why Use AdWord Extensions

Whether your ads are dominating paid search or need a little boost, ad extensions help in a variety of ways:

1) Better Click-Through-Rates

AdWords Extensions provide additional ways for searchers to learn more about your business and to interact with your ad. Searchers can make a phone call or go directly to the service page that they’re looking for from your ad/

2) Increased Visibility

Using Ad Extensions lets your ad take up more PPC real estate, making your ads stand out from the others. Just compare the ads with and without extensions above and you’ll see that the ads with extensions look more robust and informative than those without extensions.

3) Give Relevant Information at the Right Time

If a searcher wants to see a more specific page or specific information (such as reviews), AdWords Extensions can provide just that!

4) Gives a Better User Experience

Because you are giving a searcher more information about your business and services, they’ll have a better idea of what to expect when clicking on your ads.

5) No Added Charge, But More Valuable Clicks

If a searcher calls your business from your ad or clicks to a service page, you’re charged the same amount as if they clicked on your headline. Because the searcher is getting to the page / contact method they want, these clicks are often more valuable.

Extensions You Should Be Using

Now that you know what AdWords Extensions are and why you should be using them, let’s review 7 essential extensions you should be using:

1) Sitelink Extensions

Sitelinks allow advertisers to include up to four site links with their ad. Not only does this take up more PPC real estate and stand out from the other ads, but it gives a searcher the opportunity to find the page that is most relevant for them.

Sometimes these sitelink extensions will give a quick summary of the subpage which is particularly valuable for adding more call-to-actions and descriptions of your products / services.

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2) Call Extensions

When a searcher comes across your ad (especially on a mobile device), you want to give them the option to call you. Call extensions incorporate your phone number into your ads so searchers don’t have to go to your website to find your phone number. They just click “call” and you have a conversion!

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3) Structured Snippets

If your business offers different types of products or services, structured snippets are a perfect way to lay these out. You can talk about different styles of products, neighborhoods you serve, types of services, etc. in structured snippets.

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4) Callout Extensions

Can’t find everything you want to say into two lines of Ad Copy? Use callout extensions to incorporate up to four messages in your ads. Callout extensions are great to use campaign wide so the same information appears on each ad, regardless of what your ad copy says.

If you want to let everyone know that your plumbing business has 40 years of experience, use a callout! If you want to announce your 24/7/365 customer service, use a callout! If you want a searcher to know about your speedy delivery, use a callout:

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5) Location Extensions

If you own a business with multiple locations, you want to be able to show the right location to the right searcher. Location extensions add your address, phone number and business hours to your ad.

With 50% of mobile users visiting stores on the same day they do a Google search (Google), having your location in your ad is critical to showing searchers how close your business is to them!

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6) Review Extensions

By using a third party to review your website, you can get feedback on your products & customer service to show up directly in your ad. Because reviews and testimonials are a large part of the decision process, having them on your ad can help a searcher make their decision much more easily.

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7) Offer Extensions

One of Google’s newer extensions lets you add offers onto your ad. Not only can you offer more information about your business, but you’re incentivizing a searcher to do business with you. Instead of searching for offers in addition to searching for the right business, they can find everything in one ad!

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Next Steps

Whether you’re already running an AdWords campaign or looking to improve one, try adding these AdWords Extensions. Be sure to test different wording to see which phrasing gets the most clicks!

If you’re thinking about adopting Google AdWords or would like more information on how AdWords can add value to your overall inbound marketing strategy, download this free eBook “Why Google AdWords Should Be Part of Your Inbound Marketing Strategy” today!

 

18 of the Best Examples of Mobile Website Design

David Falor

Now more than ever, businesses are focusing on creating delightful mobile website experiences.

After all, Google has been heavily favoring mobile-friendly websites since they updated their algorithm in April 2015 and again in March 2016. And that’s crucial, seeing as there have been more Google search queries on smartphones than on desktop computers and tablets for over a year now.

Going forward, Google will only continue to raise the bar for what it considers to be mobile-friendly (including page load time) and reflect that in its algorithm updates. So if you haven’t been focusing on improving your mobile experience, you’d better prioritize it now, or your search ranking could really suffer.

Download our free guide here to learn how to design your own mobile-friendly website. 

To help inspire any mobile website design changes you’ll be making, here’s a list of 18 companies who really nailed their mobile web experience.

18 of the Best Mobile Website Design Examples

1) Shutterfly

Shutterfly is an online service that allows users to create photo books, personalized cards and stationary, and more. Because more and more people are taking photos and then accessing them using their smartphones, Shutterfly recognized the need to create a great mobile experience for their customers — and they delivered.

Shutterfly accomplishes two key goals on their mobile website:

  • It’s easy for users to find out information about their offerings.
  • They’re selling that information by way of beautiful imagery.

When you arrive on their mobile site, you’ll see the menu items have been enhanced into large buttons at the bottom half of the screen. This makes it easy for users to quickly select which option they’re interested in learning more about.

shutterfly-mobile-site-1.png

Once users click through to one of those options, they’re greeted with large photos showcasing what Shutterfly is capable of for easy browsing.

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2) Google Maps

Everyone has their favorite map or directions application. Mine is Google Maps, which I use whether I’m walking, driving, biking, or taking public transportation. What’s special about their mobile website is that it’s virtually indistinguishable from their downloadable mobile app.

The screenshots below are taken of their mobile website, but if you’re familiar at all with the app, you’ll notice they look exactly the same. Not only is the appearance identical, but the mobile website has the speed and functionality of the app.

google-maps-mobile-site-1.png

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3) Typeform

Typeform is a Barcelona-based tech company with one, simple mission: to “make forms awesome.” Their desktop website is really beautifully designed, greeting visitors with succinct copy, high-definition videos, relevant animations, and other, more complex design components.

But for mobile users, they recognized that complex design components like video and animations could significantly affect page load time, among other difficulties. That’s why they actually removed many of them — which decluttered the site and simplified the overall mobile experience. The mobile website is a simpler version of their desktop website, and it’s still beautifully designed.

typeform-mobile-site-1.png

Take note of the large buttons in their menus — perfect for tapping with your finger on a mobile screen.

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4) Etsy

Etsy is an ecommerce website where people can buy and sell vintage or handmade items. Most buyers who visit Etsy’s website are there to do one of two things: Either they’re searching for a specific item, or they’re browsing items in categories that interest them.

The mobile website caters to both types of visitors from the very beginning. When you first go to their mobile website, you’re greeted with an option to search for specific items, shops, or categories.

etsy-mobile-site-1.png

Immediately below the search bar are thumbnail images of trending items that showcase some of the most popular things you can buy on Etsy. Mobile users can view these trending items in a collage format, and the images are big enough for them to easily tap with their finger.

etsy-mobile-site-2.png

5) Adrian Zumbrunnen

This is the personal website of Adrian Zumbrunnen, a UX designer, writer, and speaker. When you visit his website, you’ll notice right away there’s something very unique about it: It’s a conversational website.

It almost looks like a text message conversation you’d normally have on your phone — including the ellipsis to show he’s “typing.” Users are given two response options at the end of every exchange, so it’s kind of like a “choose-your-own-adventure” experience.

While the mobile and desktop experience are very similar, the desktop website feels like it was made primarily for mobile — which could be the direction sites will go in the future.

adrian-zumbrunnen.gif

And if you’d prefer not to engage in the conversation-like exchange, you can simply scroll down for details.

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6) Elf on the Shelf

Elf on the Shelf is, relatively speaking, a fairly new Christmas tradition based on a children’s book. If you’re unfamiliar, the basic premise is this: The book tells the story of Santa’s scout elves, who are sent by Santa to watch over children in their homes all over the world and report back to Santa.

Along with the book, parents can purchase an elf figurine, which they’ll subtly place somewhere in their house where their kids can see it. Every night leading up to Christmas, parents move the elf to a different location around their house to “prove” to their kids that the scout elves are real and always looking over them.

When you first arrive on Elf on the Shelf’s website, you’ll see that there are actually numerous types of Elf on the Shelf products you can purchase. But instead of forcing users to scroll through a long, text-based list, the web designers made it easy for users to simply swipe from left to right to look through all the different options — ideal for visitors browsing products on the website.

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7) BuzzFeed

BuzzFeed is a news company known for it’s viral content and popular quizzes. It also happens to be one of my favorite sources of entertainment during my commute to and from work.

And where do you think I’m checking BuzzFeed during my commute? You guessed it: on my phone. BuzzFeed knows that a lot of their visitors are visiting their site on mobile, so they’ve taken great care to create a smooth experience for their on-the-go readers.

When you arrive at BuzzFeed’s mobile website, the first thing you’ll see is some of their most popular pieces of content displayed in a simple, collage-like format using large images that are easy to tap with your finger.

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For users interested in specific categories, there’s a clickable menu in the top left-hand corner of the screen that lists out all the post categories.

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8) Evernote

Evernote is an application that allows you to store notes, images, and web articles and then access them across all your devices. Because users tend to download the app or access the website on multiple devices including desktop computer, smartphone, and tablets, it’s essential that Evernote get the mobile experience right.

If you look at Evernote’s homepage on your desktop computer, you’ll notice how clean the design is. The value statements are short and to-the-point, and the images add to the positioning but don’t clutter the page. When you look at their mobile website, they’ve kept this design and style entirely intact. Their mobile website is clean, simple, and doesn’t detract at all from the value of the app.

evernote-mobile-site-1.png

Plus, there are those large call-to-action buttons again, which are great for mobile users.

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9) Huffington Post

The Huffington Post is a well-known news outlet that reports from everything from politics and current events to entertainment and technology. What makes their mobile website unique is that they actually alter their headlines slightly for mobile users so their content is more easily scannable.

If you compare the desktop versus mobile websites, you’ll notice that the mobile website has fewer words on the homepage. The headlines are shorter and much more digestible — perfect for someone skimming or reading on a small screen.

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As with BuzzFeed, you’ll find a clickable menu in the top left-hand corner of the screen listing out all the post categories.

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10) Express

Express is a clothing store that caters to young men and women. Because their audience often comes to their website to browse clothing, it’s important for their website to include big, clear images of their clothing — especially on mobile devices, when users will need to tap items on the screen with their fingers to click through for purchase information.

Express takes their mobile experience a step further than most online retail sites. If you slide your finger from left to right across an image showing a piece of clothing, the image will change so you can see the clothing in a different view. In other words, users don’t have to load another page to see multiple pictures of the same article of clothing.

Look at the image on the top right in the following two images to see how it changes when you swipe to one side:

express-mobile-site-1.png

express-mobile-site-2.png

11) Nationwide Insurance

Nationwide Insurance provides insurance and financial services. You might think a financial company would have a really complicated website, but on mobile, Nationwide Insurance nails down the simple user experience.

When you arrive on their mobile site, you can get an auto insurance quote right away by entering your zip code — or, alternatively, you can “Find an Agent” to learn more information about their services. Other than logging in or signing up for an account, that’s all the homepage offers.

Although this gives users limited options, it makes for a much easier experience for visitors using small screens. This is a great technique to lead potential customers in the right direction.

nationwide-mobile-site.png

12) Squaredot

Squaredot is a HubSpot partner agency that helps marketers build out their inbound marketing strategies. Their mobile website is colorful, simple, and makes for easy navigating. But what sticks out to me most is how they’ve adapted their blog for mobile users. Check out the screenshot below, which shows one article in a list of many. Each article takes up the entire width of the screen, making for large, eye-catching images and text that’s big enough to skim

squaredot-mobile-site-1.png

We like how they’ve optimized their online forms for mobile, too. Check out how large the text and the form fields are in the subscription CTA below, making it easier for folks to fill it out on their mobile devices instead of pinching and zooming.

squaredot-mobile-site-2.png

13) Zappos

Zappos is an online vendor for shoes and clothing known for their stellar customer service. Their top priority on mobile is to help users search easily for the items they’re looking for on their website, so they’ve put a large search bar at both the top and bottom of their mobile website to make it super easy for them.

This is what the top of their mobile site looks like:

zappos-mobile-site-1.png

And here’s the bottom of the page (equipped with a delightful signoff):

zappos-mobile-site-2-1.png

14) ABC

ABC is a television broadcasting company known for popular shows like “The Bachelorette,” “Battle Bots,” and “General Hospital.” Users visiting ABC’s desktop website are greeted with a ton of options: view their television schedule, check out the Oscar winners, watch some of your favorite television shows, or even look at entertainment news relating to those shows.

But ABC knows that the experience on a mobile device should be simplified. When you visit the ABC website on a mobile device, you aren’t offered nearly as many choices from the get-go. Instead, you’re given one option: to scroll through large, clickable images representing all their television shows. Users can scan through these options and click into any show they want.

abc-mobile-site.jpg

15) Lean Labs

Lean Labs is a HubSpot partner agency that creates engaging, responsive, and high conversion web solutions. (They were also featured on ABC’s hit TV series Shark Tank.) The folks over there do a great job of providing a smooth experience for their mobile users, especially with regard to their design techniques and the emphasis they place on their core values, which are apparent to visitors within seconds of landing on their mobile site.

Notice how their mobile website uses scale and color to distinguish certain elements of their page:

lean-labs-mobile-site-1.png

And, like I said before, their core values — growth strategies, responsive web design, and inbound marketing — are clearly visible to mobile users scrolling through the homepage, with relevant icons to match.

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16) SAP

SAP is an enterprise software company that manages business operations and customer relations. They enhance the mobile experience by condensing information.

More specifically, they combine some of their calls-to-action into sliders, whereas their desktop website has these CTAs laid out horizontally. This helps keep things simple so mobile users aren’t overwhelmed with a lot of information at once, and it also ensures none of the CTAs are too small to read.

SAP-mobile-site.jpg

17) KISSmetrics

KISSmetrics provides analytics software for businesses. On their homepage, there’s a lot of information explaining what the software does along with a testimonial.

But their mobile site is displayed a little differently: On a mobile device, the information on their site is shown in a list with alternative dark and light modules. This makes it easy for users to skim the page without getting lost in text.

kissmetrics-mobile-site-2.png

They’ve also made the text and fields on their forms large and easy to read:

kissmetrics

18) idig Marketing

idig Marketing is a development and communications provider. Their mobile website is laid out similarly to their desktop website, but I especially liked how they incorporated the interactive heart icons into their blog posts so users can “Like” their posts.

This mimics the “Like” heart icon in Instagram and Twitter, which is easily recognizable for mobile users familiar with those platforms.

idig-marketing-mobile-site-2.jpg

These were some of our favorites. Which other mobile websites have caught your fancy? Share with us in the comments!

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published in March 2015 and has been updated for accuracy and comprehensiveness.

18 Sales Qualification Questions to Identify Prospects Worth Pursuing

David Falor

Not every lead is a good fit for a product or service — no matter how strongly a salesperson believes they are (or wants them to be). Buyers don’t buy just because they have a serious need, a looming deadline, or money to burn. They buy because of a combination of all of these factors, and more.

Get HubSpot CRM (it’s free). 

During the qualification call, salespeople can’t simply focus on establishing a fit on one of these criteria. They have to establish a fit on all the relevant factors. While the specific sales qualification questions a rep asks will depend on the product or service they sell, here are 18 solid conversation starters that can help you recognize who’s a successful customer in the making, and who’s barking up the wrong tree.

1) What’s the business problem you’re seeking to fix with this offering?

Change isn’t easy, and businesses don’t undertake system overhauls and new implementations just for the fun of it. If there’s no real problem the prospect is trying to solve, there’s no real reason for them to buy. Establish pain (either from a known issue, or from a problem the prospect wasn’t even aware of) before diving into other questions.

2) What’s prompting you to do something about it now?

Prospects who have recently experienced a significant trigger event, such as a change in leadership, market shift, legal problem, or major company development, will have more incentive to address the issue now rather than later.

3) What has prevented you from trying to solve the problem until now?

Do other priorities keep taking precedent? Is there a bend in the path to a solution? Learning what has historically blocked the way to fixing this problem can help the salesperson understand where it falls on the list of priorities, as well as alert them to potential pitfalls.

4) Have you tried to solve this problem in the past? If so, why didn’t that solution work?

Alternatively, it could be that the prospect has attempted a solution before, but for whatever reason, that patch didn’t stick. Digging into what went right and wrong with past projects could reveal that what you thought was a perfect fit isn’t actually so great — or that your prospect needs what you sell ASAP.

5) What happens if you do nothing about the problem?

If the answer is “well, not much,” the prospect doesn’t have a pressing need. At this point, the salesperson should either disqualify the lead, or explain to them the danger that lies ahead if the problem goes unresolved (only if they truly believe this).

6) Do you have a budget allocated for this project? If not, when do you expect that you will?

Money isn’t everything, but it certainly has bearing on whether or not a prospect is worth pursuing. The specific number doesn’t matter as much as the fact that your offering’s price and the prospect’s ability to pay are within the same ballpark. For instance, if your product costs $1 million and the prospect can only afford $100, the sale isn’t going to go through.

7) How does the budget signoff process work?

This question can uncover additional financial decision makers that need to be looped in sooner rather than later.

8) What are you currently spending on this issue?

If the prospect already has a competitive solution in place, the salesperson can get a benchmark of how much they’re used to spending. And with a firm number, the salesperson can then ask if the prospect would be comfortable going higher.

Here’s how HubSpot Sales VP Pete Caputa phrases this question in his sales qualification calls:

“We’ve established that your goal is X and that you’re spending Y now to try and achieve X. But it’s not working. In order to hire us, you will need to invest Z. Since Z is pretty similar to Y and you’re more confident that our solution will get you to your goal, do you believe it makes sense to invest Z to hire us?”

9) How would the decision process work with an offering like this? What would be your role in the process, and the roles of others on the decision team?

Is the person you’re talking to the decision maker? Or is the decision maker someone else? Make sure you understand the dynamics of the buying committee and who has authority over what. For example, while one stakeholder could be the “ultimate” signer, another might be the financial approver.

10) Has your company ever considered/used a product like this before? If so, what happened?

The best way to make sure you don’t repeat history is to study it. Compare your buyer’s expectations and perceptions of “good” and “bad” to your offering. If there’s a significant mismatch, it’s best to disqualify the prospect now before you spend any more time on the deal.

11) What hurdles could crop up and derail this project?

Too many potential potholes might not make the deal worth pursuing.

12) What challenges do you think you’ll come up against with the plan I’ve laid out? Do you think you’ll struggle with Z or Y?

When is a prospect who has the requisite need, authority, and money to buy as well as the correct solution timeline not a good prospect? When they won’t be able to execute the plan you’ve laid out. While some offerings require more elbow grease than others, every new product or service requires some effort on the prospect’s part to get it up and running. And if the prospect is unwilling to put in the work, they’re not going to get results. Find this out early so you’re not dealing with an unhappy customer later.

13) What other solutions are you evaluating?

In some cases, an additional vendor is brought in after a prospect has already decided on another in the name of due diligence, or to put price pressure on the incumbent provider. Listen carefully to the prospect’s answer to assess whether their engagement with you isn’t totally authentic.

14) What does success look like to you, both in terms of qualitative and quantitative results?

Whether a prospect becomes a happy customer or a detractor largely depends on their expectations. If their definition of success does not line up with what your offering can provide, it might be time to disqualify.

15) What does solving this problem mean to you personally? What do you stand to gain if the issue was solved? What do you stand to lose if it goes unresolved?

An internal champion can often be more effective at corralling the buying committee around a particular product or service than the salesperson herself. The more skin the prospect has in the game, the more likely they are to be a helpful advocate.

16) Based on what you’ve seen so far, do you think our offering could be a viable solution for your problem?

Peppering mini agreements or commitments throughout the buying process — even in the qualification call — can lay the groundwork for the ultimate agreement at the end.

17) When do you need a solution in place by?

If there’s a drop dead date that the problem absolutely needs to be fixed by, the salesperson can then work backward to determine a signing date.

18) Do you agree that the next step is X by Y date? When would be a good time on or around that date to schedule a call or meeting?

This isn’t so much a qualification question as a sales best practice. Every sales interaction should end with a next step tied to a date. If the buyer is truly committed to moving forward, they won’t have any trouble agreeing to a second meeting or call. Interest: secured; prospect: qualified.

What sales qualification questions would you add to this list?